History
HW-7-8-9 Series

The Heath company from Benton Harbor, Michigan produced a series of three QRP transceiver kits, starting in the 1970's. The first was the HW-7 which sported a direct conversion receiver and a 2 watt transmitter. Band coverage was the CW portion of 40, 20 and 15 meters. It suffered from poor receiver sensitivity and probably was not an effective rig. The HW-7 was manufactured between 1972 and 1975.

The second QRP transceiver kit was the HW-8, produced from 1976 to 1983. It had an improved direct conversion receiver and covered 80, 40 , 20 and 15 meters . Heathkit began selling the HW-8 in 1976 although they had working radios late in 1975.  In fact one pre-production model HW-8 was taken to  Barbados and operated by the ARRL  under the call sign of 8P6EU in October of 1975. The ARRL was involved in making changes to the HW-8.

The final QRP kit was the HW-9, offered between 1984 and 1991. It had a very good superhet receiver and with the optional WARC band kit, covered all bands from 80 to 10 meters.

Back in 1977, Heath sold these rigs by mail order for $129. Heathkit was famous for the quality of their instruction manuals. Even today, Heath manuals are the standard by which all other kit manuals are measured.

The Heath Company was originally founded as an aircraft company in 1912 by Edward Bayard Heath with the purchase of Bates Aeroplane Co, soon renamed to the E.B. Heath Aerial Vehicle Co. Starting in 1926 it sold a light aircraft, the Heath Parasol, in kit form. Heath died during a 1931 test flight.[4] The company reorganized and moved from Chicago to Niles, Michigan.[5] In 1935, Howard Anthony purchased the then-bankrupt Heath Company, and focused on selling accessories for small aircraft. After World War II, Anthony decided that entering the electronics industry was a good idea, and bought a large stock of surplus wartime electronic parts with the intention of building kits with them. In 1947, Heath introduced its first electronic kit, the O1 oscilloscope that sold for US$50—the price was unbeatable at the time, and the oscilloscope went on to be a huge seller.


Heathkit QRP-CW-Transceiver HW-7
Country:         United States of America (USA)
Manufacturer: Heathkit (Brand), Heath Co.; Benton Harbor (MI)
Year:             1972–1975
Power:     Storage and/or dry batteries / 13 Volt
Loudspeaker:   headphones or amp.
Material   Metal case
Shape     Tablemodel, with any shape - general.
Dimensions:     9.25 x 4.25 x 8.5 inch / 235 x 108 x 216 mm
DC-Input:       3 W/40 m (7.0-7.2 MHz), 2.5 W/ 20 m (14.0-14,2 MHz), 2W/15 m (21.0-21.3 MHz). Built-in VFO & sidetone.
Ext. power:     HWA-7-1 as an accessory.
Net weight      2.2 lb = 1 kg3.2 kg / 7 lb 0.8 oz (7.048 lb)
Price 1st yr:    80.00 USD


Heathkit QRP-CW-Transceiver HW-8
Year:              1976–1983
Power:            DC 13.4 Volt
Loudspeaker:    headphones or amp.
Material    Metal case
Shape      Tablemodel, with any shape - general.
Dimen.WHD       9.25 x 8.5 x 4.25 inch / 235 x 216 x 108 mm
Frequency:       3.5-3.75 MHz, 7.0-7.25 MHz, 14.0-14.25 MHz, 21.0-21.25 MHz; Modes: CW only; Pout: 2 W.
Net weight        2.2 lb = 1 kg 3.2 kg / 7 lb 0.8 oz (7.048 lb)
Price1st year:   140.00 USD

Heathkit QRP-CW-Transceiver HW-9
Year:               1984–1991
Principle    Super-Heterodyne
Power:             DC 11-16 Volt
Loudspeaker      headphones or amp.
Power out   4 W
Material     Metal case
Shape       Tablemodel, with any shape - general.
Dim. (WHD) 9.25 x 4.25 x 8.5 inch / 235 x 108 x 216 mm
Frequency:       3.5-3.75 MHz, 7.0-7.25 MHz, 10.0-10.25 MHz, 14.0-14.25 MHz, 18.0-18.25 MHz, 21.0-21.25 MHz, 24.75-  
                     25.0 MHz, 28.0-28.25 MHz; Full break-in; Pout: 4 W.
Net weight:      (2.2 lb = 1 kg) 3.2 kg / 7 lb 0.8 oz (7.048 lb)
Price1st year:   250.00 USD